#28: Pain v2: Annoying, or is it?

NothingWorse

So freaking annoying. I’ve been off the bike for a month now with the same nerve issue I had with my foot in January (Morton’s Neuroma). I feel like I have gone back 9 months in time and so has my riding.

[As I write this I have been tweeting with Jonathan Lovelock (@Jono_L) and if you read his crash story, you will understand that my pain is zero. Get over it Stu!]

Whilst travelling a little for work two months ago, I ate too much, didn’t ride, didn’t exercise, rode a bit, then got the injury, continued eating and didn’t exercise. Now I’ve started to put weight back on. It’s a vicious cycle when you continue to eat like you do when you burn calories.

But the thing that is so frustrating is I haven’t resolved the issue. Is it the tightness, or hardness of the shoes, or the angle I peddle in them, or even walking in them to the bike.

So I’ve decided to go back to what works and doesn’t put stress on the foot, and that is the more flexible loose fitting MTB shoes that I started with and never had any issues with. I’ll try them for a while and see how the foot settles and if all good, maybe I try the new shoes again, maybe I just cruise on and accept the MTB’s are for me.

Yet there is a question that plagues my mind and I have no idea how to answer.  Have I damaged my body for so long (smoking, drinking, no exercise) that it’s never going to be good and I just have to manage what is?  Any thoughts?

Anyhow it’s so good to be riding again, even if a bit gingerly but better than not because I hate other exercises (unless I try surfing again). My legs feel good and get stronger as I ride but I have really noticed how my lungs have gone downhill so quickly as it now only takes a little effort to get to high bpm on the heart rate monitor.

Time to work on my fitness again. Spring is coming and I have some rides to do!
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#26: More ways to keep cycling interesting

Skate Park Roady

I have decided not to go racing. I have decided for now not to do long distance. I have has a few aches and pains, been travelling for work and now winter has arrived – all reasons to make it harder to ride. But, my weight is good, my lungs are fresh, my muscles still get sore and I get comments on how much better I look.

So what keeps my cycling interesting? For me it’s the activities, and keeping up the variety.

  • During the week, I change my destinations, road types and effort
  • Especially on weekends, I try and ride new roads
  • I stop and take photos for my Instagram and Pinterest accounts
  • I take my Garmin Virb with me and record Strava Segments
  • And I also put some videos on Youtube, Instagram and Pinterest

It’s all good and I enjoy doing it even though I will never be a Steven Spielberg,

If you want to see some of my latest, I hope you enjoy my skate park rides below. I will post some more content soon.

As I ride past people on their stationary bikes in the gym I dont get how that can be interesting, stuck in doors and the relentless boredom. They will never be able to go for a four hour ride and soak up what the world has to offer.
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#22 Live long and prosper

Coffee Chocolate Saviours

  • 13 months ago I started riding a bike again at the age of 47.
  • 12 months ago today I gave up smoking.
  • Every day I still battle with it.

I have discovered that I am like an alcoholic who says “I haven’t quit, I give up every day” because for me nearly every day I face the demons.

Usually it’s just a feeling or an urge but sometimes, when I go somewhere I haven’t been for a while I will remember that I used to smoke there.  For example, I was recently at a hotel in Japan that I had been before where I used to smoke near the front door, that I understood that it’s not until I go there and face it, that I feel I have mainly overcome that hurdle.  It’s is like you have to break every little piece of the habit in your memory and it’s not easy.

If you are a smoker and have done it for decades, never think “I will quit and it will be done” because it’s not that easy and there are so many reminders, so many habits to break and the temptation to go out and buy a pack when you are angry or stressed often exists.  It’s because that is what you did before.

For me, I have found three saviours:

  1. Because I have channelled so much energy into cycling, I know that any cigarette smoke that goes into my lungs will be detrimental.  It will make it harder to climb hills or ride to the places I want to go.
  2. Having a coffee after my dinner has replaced the post dinner smoke although for others, coffee can be another addiction or is not practical if it keeps you up at night.
  3. Eating chocolate is my major replacement, especially late at night before I sleep. It’s the final kick that helps and as a cyclist, the best thing is it’s easy to burn those calories.

So I still need some kicks but today’s choices are so much better than before and when I look at my achievements, especially in the first 5 months, I have seriously surprised myself and am thankful I am on this path.

In the last 13 months:

  • I have lost 12 kgs or 26 lbs
  • I have ridden 6,871 kms or 4,270 miles
  • My longest ride is 132kms or 82 miles
  • I road my first 100km (60ml) ride in less than 5 months
  • I have saved around $AU 3,744 or $US3,368 by not smoking

I will live longer and prosper, and I am so much happier about it!
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#21: Managing the pain…

Feeling-It
As a motivated rider who wants to go faster and further, I have found that pain is something I am going to have to deal with regularly, especially since I am approaching 50 and didn’t exercise for around 15 years.

Pain. We all hate it because our bodies have been designed to use it as a warning system that can’t be ignored.

Achievement. The opposite to pain because getting results is going to require pain before, during and after the event.

Injury. This is the type of pain that no one wants. It’s the pain that stops us going forward, that affects fitness, that interrupts plans, and worst of all could be career ending.

Pain is what I am feeling now. I was having a good week. Rode some hills, got some PR’s on Strava and was ready for a long distance week, but my foot and lower leg are sore. So sore I grounded myself for the weekend and possibly longer.

Maybe I twisted it in the cleat Continue reading

#20: 1% could be the difference

1percent

In sport, you will often hear the commentator say that the game is a game of inches, meaning the littlest things can make the biggest difference. I totally subscribe to this theory when applied to road cycling.

As a smoker, advertisements about cancer concerned me but now as a cyclist, the regular reports of cycling deaths and my own close calls constantly remind me that there are always risks with getting off your butt, getting out on your bike and sharing the road with drivers.

I used to joke that “why should I exercise, I could be hit by a bus” and now that I am exercising, that reality is often front of mind, except it’s 4x4s, SUV’s and provisional drivers.

As a rider, there are basic ways to deal with risk:
– ignore it and keep moving
– don’t go out at all or
– continue riding and minimize the risk,
and because cycling has giving new life to this old body, there is really only one option and that is to keep riding and minimize the risk. Yet I understand how some people are too scared to go near the road.

Therefore my motto is that “it’s the 1% that could make the difference” where the 1% difference could be between being on a bike or being in an ambulance…. Continue reading

#19: 2013 was a year of change

La Perouse

It’s day 3 of 2014 and I sit here a bit frustrated. I have a sore throat and a flu of some nature, and that means spending four hours on my bike and breathing heavily is not really a good option, and its especially annoying that I’d planned a ride with an old mate today.

So I look at my gear that sits there waiting, I read some tweets about the cycling universe and as I stare out the window thinking that a cool summers day is a great day to ride, I reflect on what has been an interesting 12 months.

Seriously, I can’t believe the change that has come about through cycling since February 2013 and that after reviewing the stats (it’s my IT influence) I still get surprised. Since February 2013….

  • I rode 161 times, averaging 38kms (23mls) per ride of 103 minutes
  • Have ridden 5967 kms (3707 miles) in total
    That’s Sydney to Perth and 1/2 way back or New York to LA and 1/3 way back
  • My longest ride was 116kms (71 miles)
  • I reached 100km the first time after 5 months
  • My average calorie burn was 1098 cals per ride
  • and I have lost 11kg (24 lbs) in 9 months (yet I still eat some junk food)

It just astounds me that I can do this at 48 (which means basically anyone can) and comparing this year to last year, where I did nothing, sat on my ass and smoked heavily, it is a change that’s good – real good! Continue reading

#17: Why do I ride? Good question.

RidingToday a friend asked “Why do I ride? What drives me on?” And he asked me this because he has seen me go from nothing to 160km a week and keep on doing it.

So I ask myself “why do I ride?” because I wasn’t sure I knew the answer.

I don’t race (although I am considering it) so I am not training for anything.

I don’t have any events planned. I first pushed hard to achieve a virtual goal of two consecutive days of 100km. I road 100kms on the Spring cycle and another 100 on the Sydney to Gong ride but by that time, I had already learnt to ride the distance. Since then I tick off personal bests on Strava and continue to do some long rides to keep the skill level up.

I don’t have any big goals. I achieved Continue reading