#21: Managing the pain…

Feeling-It
As a motivated rider who wants to go faster and further, I have found that pain is something I am going to have to deal with regularly, especially since I am approaching 50 and didn’t exercise for around 15 years.

Pain. We all hate it because our bodies have been designed to use it as a warning system that can’t be ignored.

Achievement. The opposite to pain because getting results is going to require pain before, during and after the event.

Injury. This is the type of pain that no one wants. It’s the pain that stops us going forward, that affects fitness, that interrupts plans, and worst of all could be career ending.

Pain is what I am feeling now. I was having a good week. Rode some hills, got some PR’s on Strava and was ready for a long distance week, but my foot and lower leg are sore. So sore I grounded myself for the weekend and possibly longer.

Maybe I twisted it in the cleat Continue reading

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#20: 1% could be the difference

1percent

In sport, you will often hear the commentator say that the game is a game of inches, meaning the littlest things can make the biggest difference. I totally subscribe to this theory when applied to road cycling.

As a smoker, advertisements about cancer concerned me but now as a cyclist, the regular reports of cycling deaths and my own close calls constantly remind me that there are always risks with getting off your butt, getting out on your bike and sharing the road with drivers.

I used to joke that “why should I exercise, I could be hit by a bus” and now that I am exercising, that reality is often front of mind, except it’s 4x4s, SUV’s and provisional drivers.

As a rider, there are basic ways to deal with risk:
– ignore it and keep moving
– don’t go out at all or
– continue riding and minimize the risk,
and because cycling has giving new life to this old body, there is really only one option and that is to keep riding and minimize the risk. Yet I understand how some people are too scared to go near the road.

Therefore my motto is that “it’s the 1% that could make the difference” where the 1% difference could be between being on a bike or being in an ambulance…. Continue reading